Have You Considered Creating a Multigenerational Household? - METROPOLIST

Have You Considered Creating a Multigenerational Household?

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Multigenerational homes are coming back in a big way.

 

In the 1950s, about 21%, or 32.2 million, Americans shared a roof with their grown children or parents.

 

According to an article, published early this past August, by Realtor.com, “Nearly 1 in 5 Americans is now living in a multigenerational household – a household with two or more adult generations, or grandparents living with grandchildren – a level that hasn’t been seen in the U.S. since 1950.”

 

seattle multigenerational homes & housing metropolistTop 3 reasons why

Another report that proves this point is the National Association of Realtors’ (NAR) 2017 Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers which states that 13% of home buyers purchased multigenerational homes last year.

 

The top 3 reasons for purchasing this type of home were:

  1. To take care of aging parents (22%, up from 19% last year)
  2. Cost savings (17%)
  3. Children over the age of 18 moving back home (16%, up from 14% last year)

 

Finding the right fit

Valerie Sheets, Spokesperson for Lennar, points out that,

“Everyone is looking for the perfect home for any number of family situations, such as families who opt to take care of aging parents or grandparents at home, or millennials looking to live with their parents while they attend school or save for a down payment.”

 

Back to the extended families

For a long time, nuclear families (a couple and their dependent children) became the accepted norm, but John Graham, co-author of “Together Again: A Creative Guide to Successful Multigenerational Living,” says, “We’re getting back to the way human beings have always lived in – extended families.”

 

This shift can be attributed to several social changes over the decades. Growing racial and ethnic diversity in the U.S. population helps explain some of the rise in multigenerational living; “Data suggest that multigenerational living is more prevalent among Asian (28%), Hispanic (25%), and African-American (25%) families, while U.S. whites have fewer multigenerational homes (15%).”

 

Additionally, women are a bit more likely to live in multi-generational conditions than are their male counterparts (12% vs. 10%, respectively). Last but not least, basic economics.

 

Valerie Sheets brings to light the fact that home prices have been skyrocketing in recent years.

 

No doubt you’ve noticed that yourself, here in the Seattle area.

 

Sheets says that, “As home prices increase, more families tend to opt for living together.”

 

Bottom Line 

Multigenerational households are making a comeback, no doubt.

 

Though it’s a shift from the more common nuclear home, these households might be the answer that many families are looking for as home prices continue to rise in response to a lack of housing inventory.

 

Talk with your Metropolist broker about best options. Results could be a creative and positive process with a fantastic housing solution for all in your family.